Precision Medicine 2017: Breakaway Business Models

Patients continue to inspire and drive us to the leading edge of precision medicine.* Along the way, these heroic acts of leadership and focus need to be translated into functional business models that can be widely adopted to transform our research and clinical care enterprise.

In this year’s conference on Wednesday, June 21 (agenda below), we address the question of how to implement and disseminate these business models head on. Fortunately there are already several enterprises, some of them led by patients themselves, which provide us early answers to these questions. These are featured in our first panel entitled Early Disruptors in Precision Medicine.

As we have noted in our prior conferences, some of the most interesting initiatives have come out of academic centers and others out of purely commercial initiatives. In our second panel entitled Academia and Industry—How Can We Play to Win?, we explore how these two wellsprings of innovation can best work together.

If we are going to succeed in the goals articulated for precision medicine, some means of measuring our success, particularly for patients and improving health, should be applied. This will allow us as a society to be more agile in finding new solutions. But without a “consumer reports” like function, progress will be difficult to measure. Our third panel, How Do We Guide the Consumer in the Precision Medicine Era?, discusses how we might think about such a consumer reports-like function and where it might sit relative to other benchmarking and regulatory processes.

Our opening keynote brings us back to the roots of this conference, which is the imperative to treat patients more successfully using the latest in clinical and molecular technology. Shirley Pepke will give us a summary of her harrowing and compelling journey to develop a successful survival plan for herself, in the face of deadly disease.

Date

Wednesday, June 21, 2017, 8:30 am – 5:00 pm ET

Location

Joseph B. Martin Amphitheater, 77 Ave. Louis Pasteur, Boston

Registration

Register via Eventbrite (conference is free but space is limited)

Lodging

The Inn at Longwood Medical
342 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115
617-731-4700 (Group code: PREC2017)
Click HERE to reserve at the group rate of $219/night.
Cut-off date for group rate: May 31, 2016
Courtyard Marriott Brookline
40 Webster Street (Coolidge Corner), Brookline, MA 02446
617-734-1393
Click HERE to reserve at the group rate of $219/night.
Cut-off date for group rate: June 1, 2017

Questions?

Contact us at precisionmedicine@hms.harvard.edu

 

Conference Agenda

Time Topic & Speaker(s)
8:30–9:00am Continental Breakfast and Check-in
9:00–9:15am Welcome — Zak Kohane, Harvard Medical School
9:15–9:30am Opening Remarks — George Daley, Dean, Harvard Medical School
9:30–10:30am Keynote — Shirley Pepke, President, Lyrid
10:30–10:45am BREAK
10:45am–12:00pm PANEL 1 — Early Disruptors in Precision Medicine
  • Jamie Heywood, Co-Founder, PatientsLikeMe
  • Noga Leviner, Co-Founder & CEO, PicnicHealth
  • Matthew Might, Founder, Pairnomix
  • Peter Saltonstall, President & CEO, National Organization for Rare Disorders
12:00–1:00pm LUNCH
1:00–2:15pm PANEL 2 — Academia and Industry: how do we play to win?
  • Kathy Giusti, Co-Chair, HBS Kraft Precision Medicine Accelerator
  • Joshua Mandel and David Kreda, Sync for Science (S4S)
  • Ethan Perlstein, CEO, Perlara
  • Joseph Pickrell, Co-Founder, Seeq, Core Member, New York Genome Center
  • Giselle Sholler, Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital Head, Chair NMTRC
2:15–2:30pm BREAK
2:30–3:45pm PANEL 3 — How Do We Guide the Consumer in the Precision Medicine Era?
  • Jill Hagenkord, Chief Medical Officer, Color Genomics
  • Taha Kass-Hout, MD, Founder, Kass-Hout Consulting, and former FDA 1st Chief Health Informatics Officer
  • Gary Lyman, MD, MPH, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
  • Jessica Mega, Chief Medical Officer, Verily


*What do we mean by “precision medicine”? From the perspective of one of the members of the National Academy of Sciences committee that wrote the report, we mean taking an explicit multidimensional view of patients: not just one data modality such as genomics or environmental exposure. We argue that this perspective allows for more precise matching of humans to disease states (diagnosis), future disease states (prognosis) and appropriate therapies.


Conference co-sponsored by DBMI and PIC-SURE, a BD2K Center of Excellence

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