Breaking the Wall of Autism

First place winner in Falling Walls Lab of New York will attend global finale in Berlin

DBMI Research Associate Oren Miron won first place for his three-minute pitch at Falling Walls Lab of New York, describing how he plans to break the wall of autism
DBMI Research Associate Oren Miron (left) is shown with fellow winners Ya-El Mandel-Portnoy (center) and Heather Painter (right). (Image courtesy of Falling Walls Foundation)

On August 30, DBMI Research Associate Oren Miron won first place for his three-minute pitch at Falling Walls Lab of New York, describing how he plans to break the wall of autism by detecting the disorder in newborns using the same standard testing device used to check for hearing impairment.

The Falling Walls Lab, hosted by the German Center for Research and Innovation in Berlin, is an interdisciplinary forum for aspiring scientists and professionals from around the world. Applicants explain which wall they would like to break down, why it exists and how they intend to break it. 

Winners receive a cash prize and the opportunity to give their talk on the grand stage of the Falling Walls Conference on November 9, 2016, in front of 600 guests—among them institution leaders and decision makers—and a worldwide audience via livestream. At the Conference, 20 top-class scientists from around the world will present their breakthroughs.

To learn about Miron's breakthrough, watch the video of his pitch (below or on YouTube) or read his team's article, Prolonged Auditory Brainstem Responses in Infants with Autism (PDF from Autism Research; Open Access).

child holding ears and screaming
Breaking the Wall of Autism