Cristina Herren
Cristina Herren, PhD
Research Fellow in Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School
Mentor: Michael Baym, PhD

Cristina Herren is a Harvard Data Science Initiative Postdoctoral Fellow who is broadly interested in combining statistics, mathematical models, and experiments to study complex biological systems that are not easily deconstructed into separate parts. Her current research investigates how microbial communities assemble and change, and whether these processes are predictable. While completing her PhD at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Herren worked in a number of varied ecosystems (studying biofilms, flies, zooplankton, and aquatic bacteria) with the goal of understanding what drives the abundances of populations over time. She also enjoys the statistical challenges presented by the new kinds of data generated while studying microbial communities. She believes that microbial ecology lies at the intersection of ecological theory, microbial systems, and applied statistics. Her research touches on all these themes; during the course of applying ecological theory to microbial ecosystems, she often ends up developing new statistical methods for these novel datasets.

Disruption of cross-feeding interactions by invading taxa can cause invasional meltdown in microbial communities.
Authors: Herren CM.
Proc Biol Sci
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Asexual Reproduction Can Account for the High Diversity and Prevalence of Rare Taxa Observed in Microbial Communities.
Authors: Herren CM.
Appl Environ Microbiol
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Keystone taxa predict compositional change in microbial communities.
Authors: Herren CM, McMahon KD.
Environ Microbiol
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Cohesion: a method for quantifying the connectivity of microbial communities.
Authors: Herren CM, McMahon KD.
ISME J
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Positive feedback between chironomids and algae creates net mutualism between benthic primary consumers and producers.
Authors: Herren CM, Webert KC, Drake MD, Jake Vander Zanden M, Einarsson Á, Ives AR, Gratton C.
Ecology
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Environmental Disturbances Decrease the Variability of Microbial Populations within Periphyton.
Authors: Herren CM, Webert KC, McMahon KD.
mSystems
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Temperature-mediated biotic interactions influence enemy release of nonnative species in warming environments.
Authors: Fey SB, Herren CM.
Ecology
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